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History and Genealogy of the RoBards Family (1910) Part 16
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78 GENEALOGY OF THE ROBARDS FAMILY  

Sallie (RoBards) Jouette Family

Sallie RoBards (page 9), daughter of William RoBards, Sr., was born in Goochland county, Virginia, 1765, was married, August 20, 1784, to Capt. John Jouette, a distinguished soldier of the Revolutioonary war.  Their children were, viz.: Mathew H., Jefferson, John, Lynch, Elizabeth, Nancy, Polly, Louisa, Sallie, Jane, Matilda, Gabriel and Robert.

Captain Jouette was the hero of the following daring deed in the heat of the Revolutionary war, in June, 1871:  When Cornwallis (a Britisher) was near Richmond burning barns, fences, crops, kiling the horses of the farmers of Virginia, he sent Col. Tarleton on a special secret raid to capture the geneal assembly in session at Charlottesville in Albermarle county, Virginia.  Their rapid march was observed by Captain John Jouette.  He divined this dangerous purpose, and started at once on his fleet horse, a thoroughbred, to defeat their strategy.  The passing, firing, race was swift, daring and perilous, so hot and close that a single unlucky bullet, or a misstep of his faithful steed would place Captain Jouette at the mercy of the marauding troup.  Fortune, providence, favored the brave patriot.  He gave the sudden warning, but so narrow was the escape of the Legislature that seven of the members were captured.  (Virginia Magazine of History and Biogrphy.)

Campbell, in History of Virginia, says:

"A Mr. Jouette, mounted on a fleet horse, conveyed intelligence of Tarleton's approach to Charlottesville, so that the greater part of the members of the assembly escaped.  'Tarleton,' after a delay of some hours, entered Charlottesville, seven of the del-

   SALLIE ROBARDS JOUETE FAMILY 79

egates fell into his hands, and the public stores were destroyed.  The General Assembly presented him with a horse fully comparisoned and a pair of pistols for his vigilance and activity."

Collins, in History of Kentucky, says:

"Capt. John Jouette, born December 7, 1754, died March 1, 1822, aged 67 years, was an officer in the Revolutionary war, in which he distinguised himself for great daring, and was presented a sword by the Legislature of Virginia.  Came to Kentucky and settled in Mercer county in 1782.  Married Sallie RoBards August 20, 1784, was a delegate, from Mercer county, to Virginia Legislature in 1787 and 1790; was a member of the convention at Danville in 1788; was elected from Mercer county to Kentucky Legislature in 1792; was sent to the Legislature from Woodfoord county in 1795-1797, and afterward took up his residence in Bath county, Kentucky."

(1792 is when Kentucky was admitted as a state.)  History of Henrico county, Virginia:

A short time before the outbreak of the war (Revolutionary war) John Jouette built his house, "The Swan Tavern," on the east side of the public square, and was known in those days as "The Grass Lott" (in Charlottesville, Virginia).

Matthew Jouette died 1775.  John Jouette, his son, succeeded him in conducting the "Tavern," but shortly after removed to Bath county, Kentucky.  His wife was Sarah RoBards, a sister of the first husband of President Jackson's wife.

From History of Albemarle County, Virginia, by Woods:

The Tarleton Raid upon Charlottesville took place in June, 1781, with two hundred and fifty horse-

80 GENEALOGY OF THE ROBARDS FAMILY  

men, the British commander was passing Louisa, "C.H." at a rapid rate, when they were seen by John Jouette, who, at the time, was a temporary sojourner at the place.  Suspecting their object, he leaped on his horse and, being familiar with the roads, he took the shortest route, and soon left the enemy behind.  He obtained considerable advantage in addition by the detention Tarleton underwent at "Castle Hill," where he stopped for breakfast, and for the capture of several members of the Legislature who were visiting Dr. Walker.  Meeting an acquaintance near Milton, he dispatched him to Monticello to warn Mr. Jefferson, who was then Governor of the state, while he pushed on to give the alarm at Charlotteville.  By this means the Legislatrue, which had just convened at the place, was notified in time to adjourn and make a precipitate retreat to Stanton.  After a short time Tarleton and his troops entered the town.  Though disappointed in their main object, they remained a part of two days, and, it is said, destroyed a thousand fire locks, four hundred barrels of powder, together with a considerable quantity of clothing and tobacco, the most important as well as the most useless waste they committed was the destruction of the public records.

(It is possible that some of the records destroyed by Tarleton would have given valuable information in compling this book, particularly the facts concerning William RoBards, Sr., and the name of his first wife with the date of their marriage.)

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