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The Lyon Family in England
Source:  A.B. Lyon & G.W.A. Lyon, eds.  1905.  Lyon Memorial:  Massachusetts Families, including Descendants of the Immigrants, William Lyon, of Roxbury, Peter Lyon, of Dorchester, George Lyon, of Dorchester, with Introduction Treating of the English Ancestry of the American Families.  Press of Wm. Graham Printing Co., Detroit, MI.
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THE LYON FAMILY IN ENGLAND


   One of the first questions asked by those interested in family research is, "What is known of our origin beyond the sea?"  In the case of our own family, the answer must be, "Nothing that is definitely supported by record."  Yet there exists strong probability based upon circumstantial evidence that the Lyon emigrants, of the Eastern shore at least, came from Essex or Middlesex, England.  A short account of the Lyon family of that locality is inserted here, in the hope that it will be available in future research.

   A few years ago, Mr. Amos Maynard Lyon, descendant of William of Roxbury, desiring to solve this question, secured the services of Mr. Phillippe of the Rolls Office, London.  The result of the research, considerably condensed from Welles' American Family Antiquity, and subsequently confirmed by research in England by the compilers, is set forth below.  In it the dates are approximate, and there is no pretense that the lineage is given in extenso.
 

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  Sir Roger de Leonne, son of a follower of the Conqueror, [who must in this case, however, have splled the name Leuoine,* which strangely appears in comparatively recent times as Leuon] born in France 1040, joined himself unto King Edgar, son of Malcolm Canmore 1091; received lands in Perthshire called Glen Lyon.  His son Paganus went to the Holy Land with Geoffrey Plantagenet; afterwards settled in England.  His son Hugh de Leonibus had lands in Norfolk, Hen. II., 1175.  His son Ernald, born in Norfolk 1150, is mentioned in John I., 1199.  His son, John Lyon, born in Norfolk, had lands in divers counties; paid a fine for a false claim in Essex, 2 Hen. III., 1226.  [At this period begins the Essex branch.]  His sons were Pagan and Walter.  Of these, Walter married Alicia, and died just before 51 Hen. III., 1266; one of his sons, Sir Henry, Norfolk 1230, had lands in Sussex, was summoned to defend the seacoast, 24 Edward I., 1297; another son, William de Lyon, Norfolk 1235, held lands of the king in capite, and died, 5 Edward II., 1312.  Pagan, brother of Walter, married Ivette de Ferrers, Co. Cambridge; his children were John de Lyoun, 1225, and Thomas, 1230.  This Sir John was summoned for service against the Scots, 21 Edward I., 1294; he married Margery de Ackle, and had children, John de Lyon, Baron, 1250, whose arms are given below, and Sir Adam, Knight, 1255.

   Baron John's children were Sir Adam 1285, Richard 1287, Sir John 1290.  This last, Sir John of Forteviot, settled in Scotland.  His son, Sir John of Forteviot 1320, was a favorite of Robert II., and married his daughter Jean; he was killed in a duel 1383; and it is from this Sir john that have descended the Scottish Earls of Strathmore, whose lineage is found in Burke, and to whom reference is made in the preface of the Rolfe edition of Macbeth.

   Assuming Baron John's children as a first generation, Sir Richard1 had three daughters, and a son Richard,2 who was a vintner in London, and was created sheriff 1374, and died 1381.  Sir Adam1 had (1) Sir John2 1320 and (2) Adam de Lyon2 1325.

   Sir John2 had (1) Sir Richard 1350, of Oxford, Cambridge and Huntingdon; (2) Sir John 1353, of Kingsland, Co. Suffolk and Co. Norfolk; (3) Sir Henry 1355, of Ruislip, born in Norfolk.  [At this point occurs the divergence between this pedigree and the one given later.]



*The name of Leonne is not found in the list of those who came over with William the Conqueror.  The following occur:  Loious, Loueney, Loveyne, Lovein, Lovan, Leuuin, Lieuvin.  Louveyne (Fr. Louvain) seems likely to have been the name corrupted into Lyoun.  The Domesday book has among names of ancient land holders, Leuin, Leuena and Lining.
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Henry3 had (1) John of Ruislip, Middlesex, 1380; he was at the battle of Agincourt.

John4 had (1) Henry 1410; (2) John 1415.

Henry5 had (1) Henry of Ruislip, 1440; (2) John "of preston," 1450; (3) Thomas "of Perifere," 1453; (4) William 1460.

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